News
 
27 November 2020
COVID-19 as innovation driver: Making IT sustainable (Part 2 of 3)

When the first wave of COVID-19 infections swept through the country in the spring of 2020, many large companies switched their operations to remote work almost immediately. Without warning, IT departments were pressured to meet the technical prerequisites, under completely new conditions. While most IT units rose to this immense challenge very well and very quickly, many companies are now considering changing their business requirements in the medium and long term. , many large companies switched their operations to remote work almost immediately. Without warning, IT departments were pressured to meet the technical prerequisites, under completely new conditions. While most IT units rose to this immense challenge very well and very quickly, many companies are now considering changing their business requirements in the medium and long term. 

During the current second wave of COVID-19, distributed working between office and home office has once again become the new normal, but many practitioners and observers assume that remote work will remain a permanent feature of many companies even after the COVID pandemic. This long-term shift would place new demands on IT, such as increased remote work availability, performance and data security. In times of general cost pressure, major technological changes (keywords cloud and S4/HANA) and a lack of resources, such a major management task is by no means easy to master.


All the while, more and more companies are pressured to respond to changing customer requirements and growing security risks.


The organizational responses of IT to these diverse challenges include both conventional and highly innovative elements.


At the core of every efficient IT organization is a transparent, well-defined governance concept with clear roles, responsibilities and decision-making processes. Within this framework, business-related, dynamic IT activities should be assigned to the respective business units, while areas with high economies of scale should be bundled centrally. Business-related "business IT" management should be as agile as possible, in close interaction with the specialist departments on site and ideally including integrated DevOps structures to ensure high autonomy.


These and other new or existing components of efficient IT organizations should be designed and implemented in the company in a holistic approach. Clearly defining the target organization model and ensuring comprehensive and continuous cooperation among IT team members are critical to success. Our experience at acondas shows that this is the best way to ensure that new content and structures are supported and lived sustainably. The result is a powerful, flexible and demand-oriented IT organization that can help companies rise to the challenges of COVID-19 and any future challenge it faces. 


Picture source: iStock/AlonzoDesign

 
News
 
COVID-19 as innovation driver: Making IT sustainable (Part 2 of 3)

When the first wave of COVID-19 infections swept through the country in the spring of 2020, many large companies switched their operations to remote work almost immediately. Without warning, IT departments were pressured to meet the technical prerequisites, under completely new conditions. While most IT units rose to this immense challenge very well and very quickly, many companies are now considering changing their business requirements in the medium and long term. , many large companies switched their operations to remote work almost immediately. Without warning, IT departments were pressured to meet the technical prerequisites, under completely new conditions. While most IT units rose to this immense challenge very well and very quickly, many companies are now considering changing their business requirements in the medium and long term. 

During the current second wave of COVID-19, distributed working between office and home office has once again become the new normal, but many practitioners and observers assume that remote work will remain a permanent feature of many companies even after the COVID pandemic. This long-term shift would place new demands on IT, such as increased remote work availability, performance and data security. In times of general cost pressure, major technological changes (keywords cloud and S4/HANA) and a lack of resources, such a major management task is by no means easy to master.


All the while, more and more companies are pressured to respond to changing customer requirements and growing security risks.


The organizational responses of IT to these diverse challenges include both conventional and highly innovative elements.


At the core of every efficient IT organization is a transparent, well-defined governance concept with clear roles, responsibilities and decision-making processes. Within this framework, business-related, dynamic IT activities should be assigned to the respective business units, while areas with high economies of scale should be bundled centrally. Business-related "business IT" management should be as agile as possible, in close interaction with the specialist departments on site and ideally including integrated DevOps structures to ensure high autonomy.


These and other new or existing components of efficient IT organizations should be designed and implemented in the company in a holistic approach. Clearly defining the target organization model and ensuring comprehensive and continuous cooperation among IT team members are critical to success. Our experience at acondas shows that this is the best way to ensure that new content and structures are supported and lived sustainably. The result is a powerful, flexible and demand-oriented IT organization that can help companies rise to the challenges of COVID-19 and any future challenge it faces. 


Picture source: iStock/AlonzoDesign